Family Business

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Family Business

By GREG JONES<br>The Beaufort Gazette
Published Saturday, February 18, 2006 in The Island Packet  |  522 Words  |  /BeaufortGazette/local_news

Yunhi Flores spends six days a week earning a living on the Chechessee River by catching shrimp, crabs and oysters that she sells.'
Now Flores and her husband, Trino, want to turn their Shell Point home at the corner of Cypress Street and S.C. 802 into a seafood market and are asking for annexation into Port Royal to reach that goal.'
"They won't be disappointed that I'm here," Flores said this week. "There won't be any negativity with us here."'
This month the Port Royal Town Council gave preliminary approval to a plan to rezone and annex the Flores' property, allowing the family to operate a market out of its home. But the family is asking the town to consider a different zoning that would allow the market to be built next to the home.'
The rezoning and annexation requires one more reading by the Town Council and a public hearing.'
But many of the Flores' neighbors, concerned that a new market will negatively affect the community through increased traffic and property taxes if their land is included in later annexations, have opposed the proposal.'
"I don't want to see the integrity of the neighborhood go down," said Dee Gonzalez, 52, who has lived on Cypress Street for 13 years. "This is a nice neighborhood, and I want to see it stay the same." '
Other residents said they support efforts to start a business, just not on their street. '
Teddy Colleran, 44, who lives on S.C. 802, said Cypress Street isn't designed to support a business.'
"I support free enterprise, but I just don't feel this is a good place," he said. "Great idea, wrong location. It will cause a traffic jam and cause us to have a new traffic light."'
But Yunhi Flores, a native of South Korea who came to America in 1980, said she is going to continue with her annexation plans. '
She said property taxes may increase because of the town's outward growth but not because of her business. '
"It is important that I get along with my neighbors," said Flores, who makes deliveries to her customers' homes and sells the seafood her family catches from the back of her truck. "I want them to be my neighbors and not my enemies."'
Flores said she wants to take advantage of the traffic on S.C. 802.'
E.B. Hudson said the only reason the street is busy is because of the construction of new homes. '
Hudson, a retired Marine who has lived on Cypress Street since 1973, said the traffic will subside once the construction ends, not including the residents who will come in to fill the new homes.'
Flores said she is providing a service for Beaufort County by selling fresh seafood for an inexpensive price. She said her business will be clean and will not have a terrible smell. '
"It not only helps me, (but) it helps businesses and people who visit Beaufort County," she said.